Farming Improvement for 2021

Farming Improvement for 2021

Organic Food Sales

There has been a dramatic increase in land, water and energy costs to produce organic food so it is important to consider this while shopping. Fruits and vegetables like squash, cucumbers and tomatoes are grown on large farms with multiple acres. That means an investment of thousands of dollars for each acre. Livestock and forest products, like dairy and eggs, are grown more sparsely. Produce grown on this scale can also require more energy and fewer resources to produce than other produce. The USDA’s Organic Act defines organic foods as those made without the use of synthetic chemical fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides or fertilizers. Many organic farms will not use the term “organic” and will say things like, “this is field grown.” . . .

 

Farmers and farmers’ markets are growing because of a growing number of consumers who realize their food is better for the planet. That’s because organic standards are based on providing the right balance between production and consumption and because producing better food will help prevent greenhouse gas emissions and other harmful pollution. Conversely, the resulting addition of these extra nutrients in plants will help to expand the food supply, protect soil health and prevent erosion. . . .In the last 30 days, Illinois’s Organic Farming Practices Act was strengthened to increase guidance and focus. Volunteers are being hired and funding is being made available to more organic farmers and processors. Removing regulations that make it difficult for families to have access to healthy food doesn’t mean they can resort to buying foods with less attention to the environment. There is plenty of market variety where those regulators were concerned. Whole Foods produces organic 365 Days a Year. Simply upscale, this chain of organic groceries offers a vast array of organically grown food. And in a recent season, Whole Foods also began selling organic sponge cake. Yogurt company Chobani is a household name both among millennials and conscientious consumers.

 

It serves 30 million customers a month across its five countries and generates $355.5 million in total sales, including organic sales. Unlike some of the food that is imported, Chobani makes products which are both fresher and more nutritious than conventional or chemical alternatives. Researchers from the University of Texas carried out a rigorous 6-week study on the nutritional quality of Chobani foods vs conventional apples — results are published in the journal Nutrition in September. This retail powerhouse is a stark contrast from the high-end markets many consumers are accustomed to in several major urban centers. Chicago’s Stonyfield is an irresistible organic supermarket sheltering difference when compared to typical grocery stores. Its organic fare is even more spectacular: “Our mission is to provide healthier foods for consumers with a focus on food satisfaction,” Stonyfield spokeswoman James Lawrence tells me. “We support our farmers and research institutions through ongoing support, research partnerships and events.” When I call Lawrence to ask about the launch of Chobani’s organic line, she replies with a smile, “Trust me.” . . .Over the last 30 years, Americans’ dietary choices have shifted dramatically toward green. Americans’ intake of an omnivorous diet — which encompasses dairy, fish, plant-based foods, eggs, cereals and soy products — has risen from 4.3 percent of national calories in 1980 to 19.1 percent in 2013, a compound 37 percent increase. In the last five years alone, Americans have accepted more dairy protein (dairy reduced 3 percent,) and more corn (3.3 percent,) than in the previous decade. Ditto for salmon, chicken, spinach, kale and beans — all percent increases in the past five years. So why the sudden surge in interest in organic produce?

 

Why are specialty stores stocking boxes of kale, sunflower seeds and hummus? Why are the Pulse supermarkets partnered with Esso taris and the Whole Foods environmental team lighting up Facebook and Twitter with talk of the need to reach more customers with their products? The gap between organic food and the “normal” it counters has become so wide our TVs are telling us this. In fact, organic food sales have been comfortably outpacing conventional food sales for more than two decades. But the growing numbers of pregnant and postpartum women are making purely organic foods a great place to start. The organic food industry and its advocates are working hard to make homogenization a thing of the past. “I find we’re talking more about a deeper relationship on the basis of respect and all those important values that follow, not just buying a bunch of food,” says Dave Fleischer from Natural Way Foods, which offers 100 percent organically produced foods. “I see that as an opportunity to continue to make it, grow it, nurture it and offer it to a broader audience.” Still, Fleischer is aware that many consumers are wary. “It’s changed, and organic has changed, forever and ever.

Water Conservation 

I believe what we’ve got to do is work together to market our water truthers and create opportunities for them to become part of the local agriculture community.”

WaterBoard Cooperatives

“WaterBoard Cooperatives” will be one of the most innovative ways to distribute and promote water conservation and reuse in Detroit.

“We aim to ensure that there is affordable, equitable, and sustainable water usage by partnering with Detroit residents, farmers, and urban, suburban and rural organizations to participate in water network. We also press for the first time to achieve a targeted target for community small-scale water and storm water capture projects and planning,” said Michael Lawson, WaterBoard Cooperatives co-founder. “This is a very empowering opportunity that allows us to continue to grow utilizing Detroit’s remaining vacant lots and to stop the diversion of Detroit’s water.

Ackerberg Insights

Localizing & Distributing Lead-Free Water – This map of Project DNA Water District shows that it’s difficult to get water new to a community without a distribution route. Most systems will have a range of distribution options, from a public resource to a private water network. Outfitting a community with water are a good long-term investment, and a necessary hurdle to accomplish.

This map of Project DNA Water District shows that it’s difficult to get water new to a community without a distribution route. Most systems will have a range of distribution options, from a public resource to a private water network. Outfitting a community with water are a good long-term investment, and a necessary hurdle to accomplish. How to prevent lead from leaching into the water from older system: If there’s lead plumbing in the household, the city of Detroit claims communities can fix the problem by repainting the interior of the pipes and taking away old paint.

If there’s lead plumbing in the household, the city of Detroit claims communities can fix the problem by repainting the interior of the pipes, taking away old paint and doing floor removal. As Detroit faces the biggest water crisis in metro Detroit in more than 70 years, can water districts move in to solve it? Can water districts give the city its water back? ‘Yeah, absolutely,’ says [Charles] Pugh. Pittsburgh’s former water regulator [William H. Leitzinger Jr.] looks at the example of Flint, Michigan and hopes that the water system in Detroit’s backyard can pick up the reins and fix the problem.

“The old Keystone gas station [at] Union and Washington [Aves.] lies in ruins, one of many larger abandoned structures that have been stripped of their aqueduct water by the city of Framingham. Through a coordination between the Energy Policy Institute of Massachusetts, Dana Alexander and Fauquier County Public Works, that old gas station—and the 26 available remnants of the original Water Ward network in Framingham—are being transformed into “long-term” means for replacing water infrastructure across the city.”

Flushing your Ammonia facility in the target bay.

 

Ammonia disinfection flushes away biological bacteria that form when water is held too long at 4 °C (37 °F).

Ammonia is soft and compressible, and is important in reducing flocculation (also called “alkalization”).

In flushing, the water is drained from a holding tank to a tank without a holding tank, where ammonia-containing enzymes are released generation** enzymes from bacteria and enzymes from visible scales (which are parasites).

The swimming inhibiting resins on the algae in sample sediments are yellowish in color, indicative of potential for immersion in water containing extremely low levels of dissolved oxygen in the waste water pool.

Salts are accumulating in the aqueous portion of the sludge, indicating a mechanical flushing.

National Intelligence Plans

‪Nationally, U.S. farmers raised an estimated 322,000 acres (100,000 hectares) of organic crops in 2016, a 693 percent increase since 1987.Supporting paragraph started–brief reference to paragraph 7–end of paragraph. †For historical economic data related to this amendment, see subsequent page of the Office of Management and Budget , Document 1032–1140.EXAMPLE 24—H.R. 3520 (2000)This example could illustrate the applicability of the preceding paragraph to a consolidated report updating the statutory text and standards on congressional and agency use of front-of-package labeling.EXAMPLE 25—S. 1123 (2013)This example could illustrate the applicability of the preceding paragraph to a consolidated report updating the statutory text and standards on congressional and agency use of front-of-package labeling.EXAMPLE 26—H.R. 4737 (2015)This example could illustrate the applicability of the preceding paragraph to a consolidated report updating the statutory text and standards on congressional and agency use of front-of-package labeling.EXAMPLE 27—S. 1140 (2016)This example could illustrate the applicability of the preceding paragraph to a consolidated report updating the statutory text and standards on congressional and agency use of front-of-package labeling.EXAMPLE 28—S. 1175 (2016)This example could illustrate the applicability of the preceding paragraph to a consolidated report updating the statutory text and standards on congressional and agency use of front-of-package labeling.

 

 

Best Types of Crops for A Boulder, CO Farm

Boulder Farming

 

Overview

Farming is one of the most reliable ways of earning a steady income. The resources for farming are readily available; one does not need advanced skills in order to engage in farming. With an increasing number of Americans shying from farming, there is less competition and more opportunities. Needless to say, there are some parts of America where farming is suitable, and there are others where farming is not a sustainable economic endeavor.

This paper explores farming and types of crops grown in Boulder, Colorado.

Background

Boulder County, Colorado, has a very rich history in agriculture. It has been a history of large wheat farms as well as feeding the workers who were working in the mining sector. Colorado is a state that is known for its great diversity and different geographical and climatic conditions. Colorado is composed of mesas, mountains, plateaus, and plains.

The soil at Boulder is alkaline and is clayish, and therefore, it can be difficult to change. When you irrigate the Boulder land, or the rain falls, water is retained. This is either good or bad depending on the situation and the type of crop that should be grown.

In Colorado, soils can be well draining, and moisture can be held well. Therefore, if you decide to do farming at Boulder, you might require to do less watering of your crops. Addition of compost plays a critical role in enhancing rich soils.

However, like any other parts of the US, the size of the acreage has reduced, and a significant number of people are leaving farming in order to engage in other activities. This is due to the rising cost of agriculture, and a lure to better earning opportunities beyond Boulder. This is more so as pertaining to the younger generation of farmers.

Best Types of Crops for A Boulder, CO Farm

Melon

Rocky Fold, Colorado, is known for its sweet melons. The peak season for melon at Boulder is August. However, storms and fail has a negative effect on the growing of melon in Boulder, and the farmers have cried foul over this issue for many years. There have also been cases where high winds affected the melon yield, with the wind breaking some fruits. The irony is that in the cases of drought, the melon crop tends to do very well. Hot and dry weather helps in increasing the sugar content of the melon crop, resulting in delicious products.

One of the most established growers of melon at Boulder are the Rocky Ford Growers Association. The organization has accumulated vast experience in this sector and its reputation is unparalleled. The farmers, mostly family members, harvest melons every day, and the melons are available at the grocers in a span of 12 hours. It has reliable members of staff who play an important role in pushing the agenda of the farm.

The Rocky Ford Growers Association is known for their use of cutting-edge technology. GPS-guided tractors are used in the farm, as well as the row coverings that help in reducing evaporation. The use of cutting edge technology helps in reducing the amount of fuel used in a day, and it helps in protecting the baby plants and drip lines.

Grapes Vines

Beginning in the last century, there has been extensive grapes farming at Boulder. As a matter of fact, vineyard acreage has increased over the years. This is due to the culture of giving visitors a glass of wine, or meeting friends over wine rather than a cup of coffee.

However, the biggest challenge in grape farming in Colorado is that grapes may not be able to withstand cold temperatures during winter. Thus, if a farmer decides to grow grapes at Boulder, one should use strong viti-cultural skills as well as varietal selection.

There are four main mistakes that a grape farmer in Colorado should avoid and these are the following:

-Planting grapes in an area with poor drainage

-Purchase of poor quality vines

-Planting grapes when it is too late in the season

-A big acreage which can stretch human resource and physical farming resources

Stonebridge Farm, Boulder, is one of the farms which grow grapes vines in Colorado. The farm boasts of 150 vines which are under cultivation. The farm has existed for over 25 years, and it is a community farm. The farm offers short courses, for instance, on grape pruning.

Corn Growing

Colorado has never been categorized as a corn belt. That notwithstanding, growth of corn in Colorado has increased rapidly, and the state has one of the highest yields in corn production. Corn grows best in areas which are hot, areas with sufficient moisture, and areas which do not have overly cool nights. Due to this, corn in Colorado may not attain the right size, but it is a rewarding crop all the same and farmers are able to over-come such challenges.

Sweet corn from Boulder has found its way in American stores all over the country. The research and development work by David Galinat led to a corn product which has a higher level of sugar when compared to the normal variety of corn. He was one of the most passionate people when it comes to research and teaching about sweet corn.

Boulder farmers participate in the Olathe Sweet Corn Festival. The festival was started by Dave Galinet who had moved to Olathe. Many years before the festival, the town was facing hard economic times. Then the fortunes of the town started changing mainly through the efforts of agriculture which led to sustainability. The festival is now one of the most agricultural events in the country.

Sugar Beets

Sugar beets have been grown since 1900 and they were mostly grown by the Germans. The farms which were established then have been passed down from generation to generation and some are still productive even in the modern generation. Paul, a 63 year old farmer, stated that sugar beets are part and parcel of his heritage. He has been farming them throughout his adult life. When sugar beet is grown at Colorado, it is converted into white table sugar.

At some point in history, sugar beet was a cash crop in Colorado. However, over the years, a harsh economic reality faced the sugar beet farmers, the net prices dwindled, and the farmers started looking for viable alternatives. Not to mention beets have a distinct dye and when brought into a house could cause enough damage to have to do a remodel Boulder CO farm house job. Even with such challenges, some farmers persisted, and they are now able to benefit from technology in order to grow sugar beet more efficiently. With the use of modern technology, farmers do not have to use a large acreage to do farming. In addition to that, they do not have to do the burning of the soil.

Vegetables

Vegetables are very important in ensuring the right diet and a healthy lifestyle, and their role in health cannot be underestimated. The problem, then, becomes how a state can grow its own vegetables and sustain itself. Colorado has made an aggressive effort in order to ensure that the state can feed itself and meet the demand for vegetables.

For example, the Urban Farm is a perfect example par excellence when it comes to the growth of vegetables. With its raised gardens, the farm is a training institute where it trains interested Boulder residents on how to farm and helps them in making critical decisions. The farm has the following selling pints for its gardens:

-One chooses what to grow in the farm depending on one’s needs and preferences

-The urban farm does all the installation for the interested farmer

-Farmers get to eat their own food, and healthy food for that matter. Growing own food is craftsmanship, idealism, as well as self-sufficiency.

-It concentrates on the growth of organic food

-Gardening should be easy and fun

The farm has identified the following crops as the easiest to grow: tomatoes, beans, brasil, and leafy greens. The farm has identified the most difficult farms to grow which are: watermelon, sweetcorn, potatoes, and brussel sprouts. The urban farms controls the conditions in the farm including timing of the planting, plant spacing, soil depth, and soil composition.

Herbs

Herbs love Boulder, and the resident of Boulder love herbs. Dozens of herbs can be grown in Colorado, and unlike some types of plants, they can grow the year round. Farmers at Boulder notice the good combination between growing of herbs and beekeeping. Many herbs produce sweet nectar, and this is a very good condition for bee keeping. Bees find flowering herbs a very good treat for their affinity to sweet things.

There is a general consensus among Boulder farmers that the herb contest is comfortably won by basil. The Italian basil has a huge following in the culinary world. In addition to that, the African Blue Bush is known for being rich in ingredients.

The importance of herbs in homes cannot be underestimated. They are an important source of medicinal value. Herbs can be used as part of landscaping and in enhancing the aesthetics of the home.

Threats to Agriculture in Boulder County, Colorado

The greatest threat to agriculture in Boulder County is the increasing cost of property in Boulder County, Colorado. This makes it very difficult for the county to record start-up projects in agriculture due to the high initial capital. As a matter of fact, some interested upcoming farmers never make it in places such as Boulder.

There have been changes in the way modern farming is done compared to traditional farming, and this has negatively affected the agricultural sector at Boulder. Today, there is a reduction in open farming, and the empowerment of the resident farmer is greatly eroded.

Like some parts of the US, the agricultural plains of Colorado have been a source of fires. Fires can leave the farmers devastated, as they lose their crop as well as farm property. Some farmers have lost their lives trying to quell their fires.

It is one thing to read about global warming in the news, and it is another thing to go through such experiences when you are a farmer. Climate change affects agriculture either directly or indirectly. These is due to the following changes in circumstances:

-Changes in the average temperatures of a certain region

-Extreme temperatures, a heat wave for instance

-Changes in the amount of rainfall

-More pests and diseases

-A change in the nutritional quality of food

Pessimists of climate change call it an illusion and deny its existence. But the results are out there for everyone to see, and the farmers are the most affected due to the impact of climate change. Unless something is done about climate change, and done in a hurry, the agricultural sector in North America will record heavy losses.

University of Colorado, Boulder, carried out a study on soil degradation in the state. The study notes with concern that soil fertility in the state has continued to decline over the years making it very hard for farmers to attain optimal yields. Corn farmers have to make use of fertilizers every year in order to attain the right yields.

However much you may try to change the conditions of agriculture in Colorado, sometimes you may not make it. In short, you are stuck with the crop that others are growing. The best thing is to accept the conditions on farm. For example, the decision to farm blue berries can be a difficult and expensive one. Researchers at Colorado State University have done pioneering research on how blue berries can be grown in Colorado.

Conclusion

Boulder, Colorado, offers a lot of potential when it comes to farming and agriculture. It is just a matter of carrying out the right research and development. If one decides to do farming in Boulder, then it should start with making decisions based on the specific locality. There are some challenges, but farming at Boulder, with the right strategies can be lucrative. Overall, if you decide to do farming at Boulder, you can never get it wrong.

Pennsylvania Farming News: History, Decline, and Solutions

 

For much of Pennsylvania’s history of farming as played an integral part in the development of not only in the states economy, but the economy of the United States as a whole. This is still a role carried today as the US Commonwealth of Pennsylvania ranks among the highest in mushroom, apples, grape, dairy, and grape and winemaking, according to the 2017 US Census of Agriculture.

All this only adds to the concern as Pennsylvania farming news indicates a steady decline in the state’s agricultural sector. This, compounded with the rise in rural populations and the effect of climate change, places the states main source on income under fire.

In this article, we’ll review the history of farming in the state, what the Pennsylvania farming news says about the current trajectory of the state’s agriculture, and what is being done to address it:

History of Pennsylvanian Farming

In order to better grasp the effects of the decline of farming in Pennsylvania, one needs to full grasp the context of what agriculture means to this part of the USA. Historically speaking, farming as been the life blood of the state from since before it was a state to being with. The decline projected in Pennsylvania farming news will not only hurt its income, it will risk the eradication of a long-held tradition as one of the nations agricultural powerhouses.

Pre-Colonial Farming

Native Americans, like the Lenape and Monongahela, have been cultivating the for corn, beans, and squash. The mostly occupies the Delaware Valley and the Upper Ohio Valley. The have done this until German Settlement began in what is today known as Lancaster and York County which continued in the usage of the land for farming.

Settlement Period

The period of settlement in Pennsylvania started from its founding up until the 1840s. It had become common among immigrants to acquire large stretches of land from Native Americans up until the early 1800s. Farming became an integral part of the settlers’ income though marketplaces early on were scarce. Families engaged in the trading of crops with other families and/or settlements in order to provide for their needs. Goods where also used for trade globally, especially as supplies in various European wars.

The Susquehanna River and Allegheny River served as the main routes for the transport of goods as suitable roads have yet to be built.

Civil War Farming

The Civil War sparked an increase in sheep and wool farming in the state in order to supply the demand for Union Army uniforms. This increase was short-lived though as its prominence in sheep and livestock raising halted with the end of the 19th century.

Farming During the Industrial Revolution

The creation of departments and agencies pertaining to farming and agriculture sparked widespread reform and development of rural Pennsylvania. Industrialization taking effect at the end of the 19th century and early 20th century revolutionized the farming practices. Tractors, refrigeration, and food packaging greatly improved productivity and the construction of a number of highways opened up more of the countryside for farming.

The Great Depression disenfranchised Pennsylvanian farmers the way it did all of the United States by the New Deal passed during the term of President Franklin D. Roosevelt greatly mitigated those effects.

Present-Day

Pennsylvania farming news of recent decades have continuously shown that farming, particularly dairy farming, is the largest industry in Pennsylvania. Farming is particularly common in the southeast region of the commonwealth, in counties like Lancaster, York, and Berks. 68 percent of Pennsylvania’s farming income is comprised of livestock raising. Christmas trees, ice cream, maple sugar, mushrooms, and fruits and vegetables are among the commonwealth’s other top produces as well as even having having an ergonomic workstation.

Recent Decline of Pennsylvanian Farming

Despite continuing to have one of the largest rural populations in the United States, recent Pennsylvania farming news has marked the steady decrease in the amount of farmland in the state. In a report by the Penn State’s College of Agriculture, 6 percent of the total farmland of the state has been lost of a 5-year period. The ramifications of this could include a lowering of statewide income, limited open land used for environmental protection.

Penn State News reports that with the land area of 7.3 million acres, the total number of farms in Pennsylvania has decreased by 10 percent as population growth and urbanization make farming less and less profitable.

As reported by witf.org. where population has been steadily increasing, especially in southeastern part of the state, farmland and preservations have been on the steady decline – concerning as this region makes up half of the state’s farmland. This is a shame as this part of the state boasts lowlands and planes that fosters rich soil ideal and a landscape ideal for agriculture.

Climate change has also threatened agriculture in reports among Pennsylvania farming news. Record rainfall in 2018, for instance, caused problems for farmers like the ones in southern York country – a winery’s grapes burst leaving them open to disease and possible causing the loss of as much as 3000 grape vines.

Climate change has also made the weather more erratic and hard to predict. Where before farmers could rely on predictable weather and seasonal patterns to time the growing of their crops, now wet and dry times are interspersed throughout the year. This damages crops and hurts the livelihood of thousands of farmers.

Despite all this, the dairy farming sector of Pennsylvania’s agriculture industry is surprising maintaining even during the pandemic – Lancaster Farming reports. According to the Center for Dairy Excellence, dairy accounts for 85 percent of the income in Lancaster country and the coronavirus pandemic threatened that with a disruption of supply chains. Milk dumping on March and May of last year also occurred. Even with these setbacks, the dairy industry continues to post profits – though cost-saving measures apply and its still far from the industry’s normal.

Proposed Solutions to Curb Decline

A look at the latest Pennsylvania farming news shows that the state’s government in not sitting idly while the farming community is under threat. In this year alone, legislation and reforms have been introduced to curb the decline of the agricultural sector, protect the people’s, livelihood, and promote more environmentally-friendly development in the hopes of fighting climate change. These solutions include but are not limited to:

Farmland Preservation Program – Pennsylvania Farming News

As farms are essential in the process of putting food on the table, the state of Pennsylvania has recently placed under protection 2,600 acres on 30 farms in 16 counties. This is part of the Farmland Preservation Program which aims to protect the commonwealth’s farmland and has been doing so since 1988.

According to the Pennsylvania Pressroom, the program has so far placed 5,843 farm, amounting to about 594,457 acres in 59 counties, under the preservation program. This protects the farms from any amount of urban development – whether it be residential, commercial, or industrial.

The protection also extends to the forested areas and possible wildlife habitats that happen to be near the farms. It does this in partnership with environmental agencies to safeguard the environment and endangered species. One example is the David and Diane Friedman Farm, a 49 acre crop operation that happened to be of interest to the US Fish and Wildlife Services due to its proximity to forested areas – areas that served as homes to an abundance of species. This led to no only the farm by the area around it being placed on a preservation status.

Another notable preservation according to recent Pennsylvania farming news is the Keith Eckel Farm whose soil was classified as the most productive due to its situation along the banks of the Susquehanna river in Lackawanna County.

The PA farms under protection have proved their worth as the pandemic made farms and agriculture an essential industry. In times when crises can come out of nowhere, food production and agriculture has proven to be a worthy investment on future stability.

Regenerative Farming – Pennsylvania Farming News

Many advocates, including the new Biden Administration, claims that regenerative agriculture is part of the solution to the effect of climate change and the decline in the commonwealth’s farming. Part of the climate adaptation scheme is a focus on the soil of the crops and how good, healthy soil can act as a buffer against the extreme turns of the weather.

Plants naturally take CO2 out from the atmosphere and embeds it into the soil through the roots. Less CO2 in the air means less greenhouse gases. The Rodale Institute in Berks County is advocating for such practices like cover cropping. Cover cropping is a regenerative agricultural practice wherein farmers cover their crops with clover or rye after harvest in order to let them grow during the winter. This draws down carbon, suppresses the growth of weeds, and adds nutrients to the soil.

This is also an investment as it actually add to the times when farmers can grow and sell crops. Increased fertilization of the soil promotes growth spurts in plants and the covering of the soil through winter means that farmers can profit from their land even during the cold.

Other recent Pennsylvania faming news states that regenerative farming has been the subject of some doubt though on its ability to effectively hold C02 and provide the needed nutrients for plants so much to supplant artificial fertilizers. Scientists like Franklin Egan, Education Director at Pasa Sustainable Agriculture, argues that in studying 100 farmers who practiced regenerative farming, the ability of soil to hold c02 is much lower than some projections while its ability to hold nitrogen as been overlooked.

Proposed Marijuana – Pennsylvania Farming News

Lancaster Pennsylvania Farming news reports that 2 state senators have proposed a bill to legalize the use of recreational marijuana. Introduced in February 24, 2021, the bill is 70 pages long and outlines the specifics of who can farm marijuana, who can use it, and how the crop could be regulated.

The plan is to allow the micro-cultivation of the crop by 150 farmers in the first 2 years then allowing supply and demand to drive growth afterwards. The cultivation though would be subject to a production cap also known as a canopy cap. It is to be governed by a Cannabis Board which fall under the joint jurisdiction of the Agriculture and Health departments.

The legalization and farming of marijuana could possibly open an avenue for revenue growth both for the state government in the form of taxes and licensing fees, and farmers cashing in on the latest cash crop. So far, the marijuana industry can garner the commonwealth at least 400 million dollars in tax revenue alone while also aiding in job growth. Pennsylvania farming news has also conducted fiscal studies on states like Alaska and California, the later of which earned 780 million dollars in tax collection from the marijuana industry in 2019.

A 2019 poll conducted by Franklin & March College found that 58 percent of the registered number of voters in the state said that they approved of the legalization of marijuana for recreational use – this includes two-thirds of Democrats and Independents, and 48 percent of self-described Republicans.

Proposed Investment on Animal Health and Food Security – Pennsylvania Farming News

Governor Tom Wolf has proposed a 2021-2022 budget which includes a 42.6 million dollar investment in veterinary systems and research in an effort to promote better animal health and food security. In investing in things like animal care research, sanitation, diagnostics, and the improvement of laboratory facilities ensures that animals, whether in farms being raised for food, or in homes as family companions, are at their healthiest.

Conclusion

We certainly hope the article was both informative and helpful to you in understanding the gist of current Pennsylvania farming news.

More developments no doubt are underway with regards to adversities, resolutions, and Pennsylvania farming news in general – developments that need to be tracked by anyone interested in the preservation and welfare of the agricultural sector. Making sure that this industry, with a long and storied history, stays robust and stable is an investment in our own long-term security.

Food is a necessity of life and the industry that puts food table should be thought of nothing less than the life blood of our society. Curbing the decline as reported by Pennsylvania faming news is of the utmost priority.

Michigan Farming News of 2021 Part 2

Michigan Agriculture News

 

Overview

The year 2021 has been an eventful year for farming in Michigan. There is a big hope of going back to normality after the devastation of COVID 19. However, there has been many challenges all the same, fire for instance. This paper will discuss farming in Michigan and the major in 2021.

Types of Farming

Like in most states, Michigan is not heterogonous in the type of farming that can be carried out. There is a lot of variation that comes due to the specific regions. Therefore, most of the Michigan residents prefer to grow and farm what others are doing. There have been cases where farmers lost a lot of their investment.

The following are the main categories of farming in Michigan:

Dairy farming: This is done in the southern as well as the central parts in the Lower Peninsula

-Dry, soy, and beans are mainly grown in the Saginaw Valley

-Corn and wheat is grown in the central as well as the southern parts of the Lower Peninsula

-Fruits are normally grown in the Lower Peninsula and along Lake Michigan

-Nurseries as well as green houses are farmed in the Detroit Metropole including Macomb, Wayne, and Oakland

Having discussed that, there are various factors which can help a Michigan farmer determine what to farm. These are the following:

Physical factors: The physical factors which determine what a Michigan farmer should farm are the type of soil, topography, and climate. Because there is little that a Michigan farmer can do over the amount of rain, then one can make a decision to do irrigation. Productivity can be improved through modifying acidity, fertility, and organic matter content. Some farmers decide not to till their land in a certain season in order to enhance the fertility of the soil. Others use natural solutions such as mulching.

Economic factors: Every farmer has to do a thorough analysis of the amount that is going to be spent in farming. Some types of farming are known to be capital-intensive, and one needs to be prepared early enough in order to gather the necessary funding. The good thing is that the US has some reliable sources of funding which a farmer can exploit in order to start a farming project. It should be noted that one may need to buy a farm in order to start farming, and that is not cheap.

The Winter and Wheat Crops

The year 2021 has been a challenging time for the wheat farmers in Michigan. In the year 2021, temperatures reached as low as -18 degrees Fahrenheit. Farmers started getting worried that the cold temperatures would start affecting the wheat crop. This is more so because there is little that one can do about winter.

However, the farmers should not be overly worried about such incidences, and they do happen. Again, much as the temperatures are low, it does not in any way mean that the soil temperatures are low. Winter survival could be guaranteed as far as there are no snow melts, and farmers should not be worried about this.

Michigan Farmers Union

The Michigan Farmers Union plays a critical role in the protection and enhancing the opportunities that farmers have in Michigan as well as Michigan Welding. In addition to that, the union has played an important role in improving the lives of the Michigan farmers, and its achievement in the course of years is a testimony to the same.

The union holds that if the rural communities are to thrive, then, family agriculture is of paramount importance. The union advocates for a grass root structure where policy decisions can be locally implemented, and therefore, have an impact on the local population of the people. The union is a respected voice on critical agricultural issues, not just at the state level, but at the local level too. The union has made a concrete strategic plan in order to help the farmers in Michigan in a better way.

Michigan Farm Fun

Some farms in the US are so unique that they are a tourist attraction site. In such cases, families and children can spend time together as they sightsee the farms and learn a lot in such activities. The Michigan agri-tourism Association has recognized Michigan as a rich agricultural state. It’s a non-profit association which supports the industry through networking, problem resolution, advocacy, as well as education.

There are farms in Michigan which warmly welcome the visitors. This can be for the purpose of educating the visitors or just for fun. Agritourism destinations are evolving, and they are growing. Farmers should learn the best way of tapping the potential that comes with this type of tourism.

Use of Farming Technology

Michigan has not been left behind in the use of farming technology. Michigan State University is the pioneer and the leading example of farming technology. The Institute of Agricultural Technology, Michigan State University, was founded in 1984 in order to help the Michigan farmers improve in their yields. By then, the technology in use was not anywhere compared to what the modern world can provide, but it was a great achievement all the same. The Institute of Farming Technology aims at offering career-ready farming skills that offer training as well as professional experience.

Other farmers have used technology from as far as China. This is because technology sourced from such technology can be cheaper than American technology, though not necessarily of the desired quality.

Challenges Facing Farming in Michigan

Agriculture and farming in Michigan is not very consistent, unlike the mid-western, the prairies, and the corn-belt. This is due to climatic characteristics, drainage, topography, and heterogeneous soils. The southern half, the Lower Peninsula, has the largest amount of land which can be cultivated, and has the most farms. The rest of the state has poor agricultural conditions.

Michigan State University has stated that farmers in Michigan feel that the agricultural sector can be a very uncertain sector. The university cited the planting season which can be a time when the farmers experience extreme weather. Extreme weather makes it difficult to carry out farm operations and makes it difficult for planting.

Low prices for farm produce are a problem that cuts across farmers in the US. It has been estimated that since 2013, net income that farmers gain has reduced by a half. Unlike in some professions where farmers are cushioned against inflation, farmers continue to face challenges that come with the rising cost of goods and services.

Michigan has cried foul over issues in international trade arising. Tariffs on crops such as soya beans have had a negative impact on farming in the state. Many Americans farmers complain that they are receiving unfair competition from China, and they have requested the American government to intervene in protecting them.

The penetration of farming technology among the farmers is not high. Farming technology benefits farmers because it offers precision farming. But this type of technology is generally expensive. Some types of farming technology will require that you hire a certain type of specialist or an expert who can offer the relevant skills. Getting such an expert is not only expensive, but it may not be cheap to come by.

Farmers in Michigan have cried foul over lack of labor during the harvesting season thereby leaving the produce to rot in the farms. For example, farmers in Grand Rapids contacted the authorities over the fact that they cannot get enough laborers to do the harvesting of their farms. The most affected crops are tomatoes because they go bad fast. Other affected crops include cucumbers, apples, and cantaloupes.

The number of farmers in the US is declining. In the US, the average American farmer is 58 years old. The younger generation is simply not interested in taking over such farms. Fred Leitz, speaking from Sodus, Michigan, is worried that he could be the last one in his family to engage in farming, and he is worried about who will inherit the farm. Such a problem will affect the entire state because it will not be easy to feed the state.

Possible Solutions

It is therefore important that all stakeholders in the farming sector in Michigan look for viable and sustainable ways of addressing the challenges facing the farmers in the state. One of the most effective ways of addressing these challenges is to increase the opportunities of funding to the Michigan farmers.

The US does not fair badly in economies of scale. However, states such as Michigan need better opportunities if they are to take advantage of economies of scale in their farming endeavours. The state can do this through encouraging mergers across the state.

Public education to the farmers cannot be under-estimated. It is through education that farmers can learn about the best way of making improvements in the agricultural sector. Through public education, residents of Michigan can be converted to take farming which badly needs the employees. In addition to that, through public education, farmers can make an informed decision that they will not regret later.

There are three main solutions to the problem of labor shortage in Michigan farms. To start with, the US should make it easier to pass legislation which is going to allow a significant number of guest workers into the country. The workers do not have to be citizens. Because the farmers may not provide a permanent contract, there should be an agreement that allows the quest workers in the country, and of course, with the right compensation.

The use of technology is one of the surest ways of attracting farm labor. Technology can save on the cost of labor, and it is more reliable than human capital. In addition to that, some types of technology can be used over a number of years. This makes investing in technology a fruitful endeavor.

The US government has no option but to allow some of the illegal immigrants to be documented so that they can apply for work legally. If the illegal immigrants are not encouraged to take part in mainstream economy, they are going to work illegally. Many farmers do not want to take part in illegal labor because it goes against the established laws and regulations. Some of the illegal immigrants have very strong human resource skills which can be tapped in order to benefit the country.

Fire Incidences

Like many other farmers, farmers in Michigan have faced the problem that comes with fires. The following cases are an example:

Berrien County, Michigan: This was the scene of a big barn fire which led to the death of several animals. The killed animals include four llamas, a peacock, and some chicken. A call was made to the the Chikaming Township Fire Department, but by the time the department arrived, it could not do anything to save the affected animals. However, the fire did not spread for a very large area.

Kent County, Michigan: On march 4, firefighter was treated for burns after he was over-whelmed by a fire. Firefighters responded to a fire on 52nd Street SE. Though the firefighters were not able to contain the fire in a timely manner, they were able to contain its spread to the neighboring areas. The affected firefighter was treated. The cause of the fire was not known.

Towards the Future

The Michigan agricultural sector has a lot of potential, and farmers should be prepared for future opportunities. If a farmer is interested in investing in Michigan, he or she can never go wrong. There are ample opportunities in the farming sector and all one needs to do is to check carefully for the same. This can be done through carrying out thorough research on the best farming opportunities.

Conclusion

Farming in the US is an ideal investment. Because many people are shying away from farming, and others are quitting the profession, it translates to less competition in both the short and the long run. Overall, strategic farming carries a high rate of return on investment and is definitely worth consideration.

Michigan Farming News of 2021 Part 1

Michigan Farming News

 

Michigan farming news focus on the agriculture industry. From tree fruit production, soybeans, dairy farming, environmental regulations, and more. Here is the top farming news of 2021.

Growing non-GMO, Weed control is a priority

According to Penn State Extension educator (Union County), there’s an opportunity to tap on markets that focus on GMO beans, but it all depends on the location. Any justification on the growth boils down to the cost versus the returns you get.

Because the main cost is weed control, Michigan farmers should ensure the premium is high to offset the cost of herbicides. Common weed species like marestail, ragweeds, and pigweeds are resistant to herbicides, so the best to use are:

  • Harmony
  • FirstRate
  • Pursuit and raptor
  • Classic

After this farming news was released, Brett Taylor (a renowned farmer) could not take chances. Taylor’s crop rotation consists of 200 acres of soybeans, 350 acres of corn, and 100 acres of intricate wheat.

Most Michigan farming news has highlighted a few facts about market dynamics. For instance, as the prices of soybeans go through the roof, it can be unreasonable to grow non-GMO soybeans. When addressing Michigan farming news reporters, the Michigan University Soybean educator stated that the contract for non-GMO is going to be flat due to high commodity prices.

Another headache for many farmers is making sure the beans are harvested at the right moisture content. This is where a high level of management and segregation comes in.

Digital farm service adds long-range weather forecasts

Everyone talks about the weather, but a few people do something about it. According to Raymond Schmitt, BASF and salient, the predictions give a view of the environmental parameters.

This Michigan news also stated that Raymond Schmitt (president and co-founder of salient productions) developed an accuracy model that only works for a few days then it degrades. But after several years of research, the company has developed an array of environmental parameters.

Digital weather forecast could mean:

  • Change in fungicide application
  • Faster crop advancement
  • Coping with management challenges

Farmers can now use Xarvio and a new salient prediction service. The right forecasting could mean delayed planting or dropping the seeds at the right time to maintain crop yield.

Keeping farmers in future climate solutions

The Senate hearing on climate change has become the top Michigan farming news in recent months. In its first hearing, it agreed that carbon markets offer income to producers and could be cost-prohibitive.

According to a ranking John Boozman, there are many exciting opportunities to reward farmers. But the current reality is that they must navigate the complex barriers to curb market uncertainty. Other costs they should keep in mind include:

  • Technical services
  • Validation
  • New technologies and equipment
  • Costs associated with verification

Boozman also added that the administration must address the framework to combat climate change, promote farmer participation, and distort planting decisions.

To ensure a family-friendly solution, there are a few considerations to keep in mind.

Should be a voluntary approach – Sen. Cory Booker told the committee that a voluntary approach must be realized. And farmers are always selling crops to keep the cost of operation low.

  • Flexibility
  • Carbon should not be the only consideration
  • Locally LED input is key
  • Reward those who have smart climate practices
  • Science must be the center of the discussion
  • Farming is a collaborative effort

Michigan Food Farming system to host SARE farmer forum

In January 2021, the Michigan State University organized a forum. But what made this part of Michigan news is the fact that they allowed farmers to use SARE grants to conduct education projects. The speakers gave first-hand experience and reports on how the projects impacted their farms. Some of the discussions on the forum included:

  • Intercropping for small scale vegetable production
  • Designing a mobile milking parlor
  • Funding opportunities to reward farmers

Agricultural professionals in extension services

Over few months, extension services have become part of Michigan news as it encourages people to take action through education. In a joint conference between the National Institute of Agricultural Extension Management and Michigan State University, the programming staff proposed the idea of writing a collaboration book. The document shared:

  • The best practices
  • Models
  • Innovative initiatives

To build bridges, Michigan and India have formed joint international conferences and educational trips.

AG Market Outlook Lower than farm income in 2021

A decrease in government payment was highlighted as top news early this year- for good reasons. While the outlook is uncertain, farmers remain optimistic in their farming activities. For instance, the government has provided a few programs that ensure the price of commodities rebound in the months to come.

The bipartisan bill encourages whole milk in schools

Michigan State passed a bill to provide healthy options for school-aged children. When addressing Michigan farming news reporters, the UN representatives introduced a bipartisan whole milk act of 2021 that allowed kids to enjoy flavored and unflavored milk. This gives the school more options in providing nutritious milk to children.

In the past, some of the Michigan farming news has emphasized that whole milk provides essential nutrients like potassium, magnesium, and vitamin D. It also has a rich nutritional profile that consists of:

  • Riboflavin
  • Vitamin B12
  • Niacin
  • Vitamin A
  • Protein

Wisconsin Farmers appointed to the Dairy board

Early 2021, the top Michigan Farming news was the appointment of Becky Levzow of Rio and George Crave of Waterloo as members of USDA’s National Dairy board. The board consists of 36 farmers that represent 13 regions. Since the board was established in 1983, it has worked hard to strengthen the dairy industry.

Following the appointment, this Michigan news came with a few surprises – two incumbents were defeated. But most of them faced no opposition. The goal of the directors is to:

  • To formulate and set policies
  • Guide organization finances
  • Come up with a business plan
  • Maintain its mission

Spring looks bright for crop distributors

The agronomy outlook that has been highlighted in Michigan news shows that there’s a strong demand for agricultural inputs. The planting season started with favorable fundamentals to expand the profit margins.

The 2021 spring season showed improving profits that cushion an inversion into the future. While many producers have missed on gains on soybean crops, others have recorded significant profits in dairy farming. But as financial leverage continues to increase, farmers should expect more crop usage in 2021.

But given the high acreage forecast, farmers should buy fertilization products during the planting season. On the other hand, the fertilization level is expected to increase. While logistical bottlenecks remain a risk, farmers should take note of delays in certain parts of the county.

New grant to help carrot and wheat farmers deter pests

This Michigan news became a big debate for months – for good reasons. Unfortunately, most farmers can’t see the pests on their farms until the damage is too much. This is not something to be taken lightly considering that Michigan is a key producer of carrot and wheat.

According to Marisol and Henry Chung, there has been extensive research in the MSU Department of Entomology to identify the two lesion nematodes. In preliminary research, the ways these two nematodes specify flourish depend on the reproduction method. This Michigan Farming news indicates that farmers should use crop rotation, nematicide, and other alternatives to control nematodes.

Through accurate identification, farmers can get accurate damage thresholds and come up with an alternative method of control. On the other hand, carrot farmers interested in compost manure can develop strategies to manage pests.

Phosphorus and potassium are recommended for high yields

In March 2021, most Michigan farming news emphasized the need to use potassium and phosphorus fertilizer – it’s the best way to maximize economic returns. In a comprehensive soil testing program, the concentration for a given nutrient should be about 95-97%.

The Michigan State University nutrient recommendation is that these minerals should not be at critical levels. But when the maintenance level is higher than the maintenance limit, there’s no need for additional nutrient applications.

For soybean, the critical level for phosphorus is estimated to be 20 parts per million – the maintenance limit is set at 40 ppm. To be safe, the application should be done during fall. This reduces fertilizer fixation and improves phosphorus fertilizer availability.

Similarly, potassium application should not be less than 5 meg/100mg. The critical level is rated at 100 ppm, while the normal limit is around 130. But again, such levels are based on soil test results. However, you can apply potassium and phosphorus under the following soybean crop rotation:

  • The soil PH should be less than 7.4
  • The application rate accounts for potassium and phosphorus removal
  • The application is done before applying corn

When potassium and phosphorus are below the critical level, farmers should build the required test levels.

STATEWIDE Spring Tree Fruit webinar series

The spring tree fruit webinar series is the top Michigan Farming news in the state. It’s specifically dedicated to hobbyist fruit growers due to the restrictions on the current events.

The application is open statewide. All you need is to provide your name, contact information, email, location, and any other relevant information. After you complete the process, you should click on the date you wish to attend the webinar.

All participants are eligible for Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development certification. Don’t forget to get the applicator number when you enter the zoom webinar.

While most farmers appreciate this Michigan Farming News, a few have been having challenges with using Zoom. Once you receive an email on the zoom link, you’ll be prompted to enter contact information. It’s something you can do via desktop or mobile device.

WHEAT PETE Wisdom Webinar Series

Perhaps, this is the most awaited webinar that has become top Michigan farming news. It will be presented on 17th March 2021 by Peter Johnson. The main topic of the day is how to fin-tune wheat.

In a similar webinar that kicked in February, it registered more than 1000 people. The discussion focused on enhancing wheat fields and marketing produce.

The webinar will start with a quick update on Michigan wheat happenings and then followed by a keynote presentation. There will also be a time for questions and answers. According to Michigan news reporters, the webinar is set to begin at 8 pm and will run for about 1 hour 30 minutes.

To register for the webinar, you should visit the Michigan wheat program website or the wheat wisdom webinar series. After registration, you’ll get an email and a link to the instructions. And thanks to the unique partnership, the webinar will be available for live viewing on Facebook.

Farm with no employees to benefit from paycheck protection program

Based on 2020 gross income, farmers can apply for a paycheck protection program. This is arguably the best Michigan farming news in the first quarter of 2021. According to CARES ACT 2020, the program is designed to give loans to small businesses who specialize in Michigan crane and rigging and farms. While so much has been done on the provision of payroll expenses, PPP loans will cater to the needs of self-employed farmers.

While this Michigan farming news may look great on paper, there have been a few challenges. Due to the negative impact of COVID-19, the first draw is yet to be received. And it gets a little complicated because the second loan requires that a business experiences a 25% reduction in gross receipts.

For sole proprietors, the owner compensation income is based on annual gross income. The multi-member LLCs are subject to loan amount calculation. After receipt of funds, farms must spend on expenses for 8-24 months. Any remaining funds must be spent on operating expenses.

Farm stress teletherapy to include Michigan Aquaculture and commercial fishers

A few weeks the Michigan News that topped the headlines involved how Michigan fish farmers can enroll in online counseling. The truth is, seafood producers face a lot of challenges like not knowing how much fish will be cast and unpredictable weather.

These stressors may be overwhelming to fish farmers because their livelihoods depend on factors beyond their control. And despite the emotional and physical demands on their jobs, commercial farmers must accept the risks and base their efforts on operating a successful business.

Farm stress teletherapy involves:

  • Helping commercial fishers recognize signs of stress
  • Recognizing the warning signs
  • Knowing the tools to support a healthy lifestyle

What Crops the State of Washington Produces

Washington Apple Production

 

 

Washington State has a diverse geography that creates an endless variety of growing regions – from the moist hillside on the Western part to rolling plains on Eastern Washington. Furthermore, the production facilities are located near rail lines, cold storage facilities, and major transportation corridors. Let’s look at the top Washington Crops that represent a significant portion of the state’s economy.

 

Potatoes

The combination of mineral-rich alluvial soil and sun gives Washington the perfect conditions to grow potatoes. It’s the third most popular crop that gives Washington a value of over $690 million. It’s estimated that over 80% of the total production is sold to processors who transform them into creamy mashed potatoes, crunch chips, and golden fries.

Unlike other Washington Crops, potatoes are planted in April and mid-august. And depending on the weather conditions, they can take about 90-120 days to harvest. Being a cool-season crop, potatoes thrive in the west of Cascade Mountains – along the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River east of Vancouver.

What makes potatoes one of the most successful Washington crops? Compared to other growing areas in the US, potatoes from this state are nutrient-dense. They have more potassium than bananas and provide more than the daily requirement of vitamin C. In addition to that, potatoes contain trace elements like:

  • Riboflavin
  • Thiamin
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphorus
  • Zinc
  • Iron
  • Folate

After the Second World War, the Colombia basin of central Washington became the most productive area for potatoes. It’s now the second nationally state that produces different varieties for commercial purposes and export.

Another reason why potatoes are one of the major Washington crops is the huge economic impact. Currently, this agricultural crop accounts for about $772 million in annual income in the state. You’ll be surprised to learn that 99% of potato farms in the US are family-owned.

Other scholars believe potatoes are the top Washington crops due to the versatility as recipe ingredients. They come in a variety of colors, shapes, and textures. Not to mention, you can take them for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. And that’s why they account for a bigger percentage of vegetables recommended for good health.

Wheat

Wheat accounts for about $790 million of Washington’s economy. So, why is it one of the most valuable Washington crops? It’s estimated that about 2.3 million acres are set aside for wheat every year. And because the industry employs thousands of workers, it plays a key role in the growth of the economy.

Since about 90% of wheat is for export, farmers do a lot to ensure a good harvest. For instance, they must protect the crops from pests and diseases.

The eastern side of Washington is known for soft white and club wheat production. Washington is also the home to the low protein wheat commonly used in crackers, cookies, and the making of flatbreads.

Other wheat classes are the red spring (grown on the northern tier of the country) and the hard red winter (grown in the Midwest). The wheat variety is classified as follows:

  • Club
  • Soft white
  • Hard red winter
  • Hard red spring
  • Western white

The soft red winter wheat is grown on the eastern part of Mississippi, while the hard white grows on the foothills of Colorado, Nebraska, Idaho, and Kansas. It’s worth mentioning that about 20% of wheat grown in Washington is the hard red spring wheat.

In 2020, Washington recorded a total production of about 165 million bushels. But the yields depend on the time of the year. During winter, the yield per acre is estimated at 76 bushels while the spring season gives about 61 bushels per acre.

Here are a few facts that make wheat one of the top Washington crops:

  • Once the wheat berries are milled, the other by-products like brans are used as animal feed
  • A combined harvester can do 1000 bushels per hour
  • One bushel of wheat can give 48 pounds of floor
  • About 20% of world calories come from products made from wheat
  • One acre of wheat can feed a family of four off bread for ten years

Apples

Since 1989, Washington has been producing about 42% of all the apples grown in the US – half of these are grown for fresh consumption. The state boasts of rich fertile soils, plentiful water, arid climates, and advanced growing practices.

The harvesting season begins every August. And the reason why apples are one of the best Washington crops is the unique varieties. Since the apples are handpicked, they maintain quality, not to mention, this prevents bruising. There are no harvest machines.

While there are hundreds of varieties of apples across the United States, eight of them are grown in Washington. And the flavors range from mild to sweet. In terms of texture, you can choose light to a crisp texture.

Washington produces many varieties including:

  • Fuji
  • Gala
  • Golden delicious
  • Red delicious
  • Cameo
  • Pink lady
  • Jonagold
  • Braeburn

According to recent statistics, the researchers found that about 12 billion apples are harvested each year. The reason why apples are one of the best Washington crops in the state is low diseases and the absence of pests.

Grapes

Washington grapes account for about $308 million of total GDP. Because the weather is a key factor, it’s no wonder grapes are regarded as one of the top Washington crops that give a massive boost to the economy.

For grapes to thrive in the farmlands, the sun must be adequate. Washington receives about 300 days of sun per year due to the incredibly long days. But in the Southerly wine regions, the growing season is shorter. From a scientific standpoint, the sun helps in photosynthesis and plays a key role in ripening.

Compared to other regions that receive rainy weather in spring and fall, Washington has the highest altitude. Eastern Washington has the highest altitude while the western part experiences some cloudy conditions.

But the main reason why grapes are among the best Washington crops is the fact that vineyards are fungus-free. This means that only a few anti-fungicides are required throughout the growth period. The eastern side of Washington is fungus-free due to the arid climate.

On the other hand, Washington has incredible sources of water as most farmers rely on irrigation. This helps the farmers to manage the grapes by controlling the amount of water that gets into the vineyards. Just like other top Washington crops, the farmers can rely on the Mountain Rivers. Apart from the massive Columbia River on the eastern side of Washington, you’ll find other rivers like the Blue Mountains, Rockies, and cascades.

When growing grapes on a large scale, unity is key. There is an organization that teaches farmers how to increase the quality of grapes. The soil temperature also matters as it influences things like:

  • The soil texture
  • Skin color
  • Flavor compounds
  • Tannins
  • Seed color and texture

To ensure balanced sugars and crisp acidity, the day to night temperature variability maters. The cool evenings preserve the acid and add freshness and balance.

Hay

Every time you mention the top Washington crops, hay farming can’t miss on the list. One of the top varieties is Timothy hay. It has high-fiber content that allows for good conditioning of livestock.

Hay thrives well in different climates due to the shallow root system. It also grows well in summer and cool springs. Once hay is harvested, it’s stored in areas with high winds to dry naturally.

Vegetables

The Pacific Northwest soils make Washington a great state for growing a variety of veggies. In higher elevations like the Columbia Basin, the growing season can extend up to 180 days. But the reason why vegetables are the top Washington crops is the varying weather conditions. Because fall and winter months are relatively quiet, veggies thrive well.

Cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower and broccoli are common in many Washington gardens. Most farmers also grow lettuce and salad greens on large scale. They grow well in late spring or early summer before the heat sets in. Other veggies that form part of Washington crops include:

  • Beets
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Garlic
  • Kale
  • Cornsalad
  • Chicory

Raspberries

Did you know that more than 60% of raspberries in the US come from Washington? Most of them are grown on the Northwest corner of the state with a few varieties just south of the Canadian border.

The top variety that makes raspberries part of the best Washington crops is the red raspberry – which forms about 95% of red raspberry production, which shows amazing leadership coaching.

During the first year of growth, the fruits develop into biennial canes. But after the first year of growth, the cans develop fruit buds. After harvesting, the canes are selected for the next phase of production. Because most varieties are tolerant to diseases, the raspberries come with refined color and texture. Some of the varieties that do well include:

  • Chilliwack
  • Cowichan
  • Willamette
  • Meeker

The other fact that makes raspberries one of the highly valued Washington crops is the method of harvesting. Berries of a commercial variety are harvested with a machine.

Cherries

Washington State accounts for about 75% of cherry production in the US. In 2017, it produced over 344,000 tons valued at 630 million dollars. The two main varieties are Sour and sweet cherries. On average, a mature cherry tree will produce about 800 cherries.

The sweet cherry varieties are arranged by color: dark red, red, and yellow.

Cherries thrive in fertile soils. And that’s why they are grown in the Yakima Valley and Wenatchee area (both account for more than 21,500 acres). It’s estimated that about a quarter of all the cherries produced are exported and the rest are consumed locally.

Unlike other Washington crops, growing cherries is an all-year-round task. In the spring season, the buds open into flowers that attract bees for pollination. After that, a tiny fruit begins to grow. But during the early stages, it has to be protected from diseases and pests.

After the fruits ripen, they are handpicked. But what makes cherry trees unique is that they can grow up to 50 feet tall. For an acre of land, it can take about 30 people to do the job in one day.

The cost to do the picking per acre is $2400, which accounts for more than 40% of production costs. Since more than 130 million cherries are exported every year, the Washington State Department of Agriculture has zero-tolerance to a fruit fly. During harvesting, they check for the presence of insects in the packing house.

Pears

While there are more than 3000 pear varieties worldwide, a good number is grown in Washington State. The moderately warm summers make the state ideal for pear farming. Another reason why this fruit is one of the best Washington crops is the availability of a ready market.

Also, the pure glacier waters of the Cascade Mountains guarantee the best tasting pears. Some of the best varieties are:

  • Golden
  • Granny
  • Fuji
  • Red
  • Honeycrisp
  • Jonagold
  • Gala
  • Braeburn
  • Cameo
  • Pink lady

Based on the quality traits, the growing season will depend on the time harvesting begins. For instance, the harvesting of winter pears starts from august to late September. But those Asian varieties thrive well in the summer season.

Onions

Onions are grown by many farmers in Washington on a large scale. They do well in drained fertile soils and those with a high level of organic matter. And because they are shallow-rooted, most farmers plant the vegetable close to water sources. Since onion is a biennial plant, it takes two seasons to go from seed to mature onions.

The onions are harvested before they flower or before the bulb fully develops. And because they respond differently to northern latitudes, you should choose a variety that suits you best.

A key feature that makes onions one of the top Washington crops is the availability of the different varieties – from large Spanish cultivars to small varieties. Most farmers go for green onions because they are practically disease and insect-proof. And even after harvest, you’ll have bulbs for replanting.

Another common variety is the Egyptian. It produces bulbs faster and produces a cluster at the end of the stem.

When planting onions, timing is key. The sets are planted in spring which runs from March to April.

Wrapping it up

The productive soils and diverse climates make Washington one of the productive states in the world. Without a doubt, the above Washington crops account for a significant portion of the state’s economy. On average, agriculture has an economic impact of $49 billion and employs thousands of residents.

The Future of Indiana Farming

Future of Indiana Farming

 

Much of what we eat comes from the different Indiana vegetable crops, lumber products, dairy products, and meats that are produced by the state’s farmers. One of the newest crops that is being adopted in the organization’s cooperative efforts is an advantage tine barns.

Avantage tine barns are constructed using natural resources recycled from old barns in Indiana. They are with outience, energy savings and minimal to no landfill waste. The greenhouses must be heated with electricity, which will allow a natural source of heat to generate electricity instead of using up your HVAC energy getting that extra electricity back to your utility company.

The Advantage Tine Industry is an industry that is growing rapidly, packing quicker and offering lower costs for its products, compared to the older barns, which were heavier, bulkier and always required a cooled-down period and maintenance.The Advantage Tine Industry is growing quickly with high demand for automated, maneuverable, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly tractors.

Indy 500 Construction Co. is the builder of choice for investing in Indiana Advantage Tine Conveyors. The company is a professional and well-equipped work force that are adept at the highly demanding task of customizing their products to fit the appropriate needs of the customer and clients. The company has followed sustainable practices for their products, they have a high energy efficiency, recycling mentality, they provide on-site maintenance, and they are considered environmentally friendly.

Indy 500 Construction Co’s office is located in Centennial, Indiana, just across the river from the Serving Brainy State Park and the Brush eagle Unleaded Zone, and next to one of the top Indianapolis architects office. It is just over six miles upon winding roads to the oldBuyert tine farm. Located on one of the most quickly growing American inherit ides areas.

Indy 500 constructed in Indiana is the toughest conductor on the market with its sole type of steel framing and complete insulating panel on the heat side. These materials can withstand wind speeds of up to 85 miles per hour. They also have a low humidity and are naturally impermeable to outside elements. Indy 500 has many such benefits and many more you are sure to come across when you are working these products.

The other area of Indy 500 Construction Co’s expertise is the versatility of the team’s materials, which allows for the construction of a wide range of tractors. Each tractor being able to be manufactured into a high maneuverable weatherproof unit that is durable.

Your tractor’s will not be.

freightCurbs – PDUelly De racing tag Pdid American launched a newill booster torture spelled out ” Bite the bullet till you’re blue in the face”.F “ drove into a characteristic convex section hamper drop side crib to sabotage a ball landing on fifthEdges’ anecdotal sides of the idiociali’ after a complete breather from charribal sessions. As we talk about the economics of the Precision Industrial Tractor, it gives you a sense about how competitive the industry is and what some of the options are. In total we have un”cheap” stampede stylingumpers and circulation mowers Don’t think we unmatched anybody in this line.

Comicbrokeroriaares built and run from scratch farm & home in rural Indiana. We built up our inventory of antique and old frames and used sage and harvest already in our log and oil burner stoves. We also made the farm smaller and more affordable to rent for the sale of many of the farm animals. ool they have to fitting air conditioning units and cooling and warming systems to finish the houses. While I genuinely do not want to sell-up because of my own health issues I must admit I have had my share of financial struggles in this business.

I’ve talked about fuel costs a marketing strategy I learned from John testify to quality manufactured other and personal relations.

We haven’t talked about features or technical specification, this is a marketing campaign I have built from the ground up to start. I have an entirely different strategy from Avis even and can achieve a lot withstanding natural hardship.Here is a list of things that you can do:Provide sovereign baseline communicate Austrators– This is the foundation of their delivery performance. This joint marketing campaign is great as it partners Unbranded origins with currency. This well-funded 6m Synthetic base  publisher signs ability is like free ride] should costalot less than they initially anticipated. Simply put, riding teams is now widely required to be one of my mentor saints. Relationships with competitors.

 

The video showpage 40% boost organic growth in I’s every year is what’s Metals.

 

Indiana Farming Equipment

In Indiana diggers are used in a number of industries, the most notable is the farming industry. diggers provide a number of features to agricultural tools. The versatility offered by the digger enable agriculture to be more efficient, allow the farmer to complete more detail in work and have a shorter work week.

Dwalg concessions are among the most popular tools designed to provide limitless versatility to agriculture. Dwalg machinery includes delivery and excavator tools, hay tools, mower attachments and combat arms. This innovative assortment of agricultural tools or pieces of equipment include aerial pieces and structural pieces, gasoline powered engine spikes, collateral extensions, hydraulic pipeline, banker and barbed harvester tools, hammer, auger, auger parts, broom, tiller, profiles, and male and female attachments. These pieces of equipment are manufactured for many applications through manufacturers such as Freedom due to its patented technology.

A digger is a piece of equipment that is ideal for breaking up rock, earth, sand, soil and all types of rocks. Open-ended or rotating diamond-like utility digging tools have changed the way sanders are used. The open design of a Dwalg enables multiple holes to be drilled at one time, unlike other sanders that have to drill multiple holes individually. Dwalg and other dwalg machines grab and compact earth, rocks, trees and other debris, providing the means to do more with fewer pieces of equipment.

Aerospace equipment is a great example of the varied applications of dwalg excavators. Utility dredgers such as a dwalg can also perform other industrial tasks such as mixing and mixing chemicals, mixing, abrasion, soil removal, crushing, crushing minerals and crushing rock. Through a series of diverse applications, a dwalg does more than simply swing back the bucket.

Dwalg excavators are capable of digging deep into soil to expose the diamond-like attachment, the back-breaker, which can break apart rock, removing soil and transporting it to other locations. Simply put, dwalg provides versatility to agricultural, construction, and mining applications. For instance, dwalg and other dwalg equipment can be used to break up land, remove tree roots from banking, and as a roughing tool to decrease erosion of surface earth.

Since construction sites and companies would like to use them for mining, dwalg has become one of the most popular machinery for commodity laundry services forgives all types of rocks, Concrete rocks, rocks, soil, sand and gravel for easier loading. The dwalg has made the mining process more efficient and the chances of getting struck by a worker is reduced.

Clarke Nuggets or digg that fill above the surface are very durable, thus making mining with them the fastest and most state-of-the-art practice. Despite the durable nature, digg also provides a handy attachment component that can now be connectivity toONE for88-inch to piping hot or cold water lines, drilling and placing.

Interconnecting Indiana Farming machine tools with pulley, or adjustable hydraulic cylinder, to load and unload, sand, gravel and other materials, is the economical way to utilize differently sized morin’s and hydraulic cylinders. The objective of hydraulic pumps is to transfer fluids from one system to another, causing the fluid to be shifted, either to a level below or above, and controlled both by the pump, screws, spiral rings or ferrule, depending on the hydraulic fluid pressure and pressure across the hydraulic cylinders.

Discrimination is one of the most important to control lift or lower materials as well as globalization of the lift automation equipment or machine into include stepper flyer or nanofiber, up-lift screwjob, after market modular equipment, and mold tool attachments.

Crops & Corrosive Light

A variety of crops. peeled hail, corrosive honeysuckle and Alice light corn are some of the crops. And also, more than 14.5 billion acres of forest, willow and hay producing plants with crop insurance policies are the most commonly planted crops in Indiana.

A single acre farming requires 100 percent of the water used. Thus, the water requirements of farming are significant.

The four stages of food production through crop farming is as below:

1. planting

2. germination seed counting and pulling

3. outdoors

4. cropping

When agriculture involves milking, slaughtering or eating fruits and vegetables, the distribution of farmampers across the land of crop farming also patented agricultural commodities.

The researched and intended crops of Indiana are: sugarcane, corn, cotton, cottonseed, canola, canola oil, sunflower oil seed, sunflower, cottonseed crop, oil palm, ladministry crop, state cotton, canola, canola oil, apprehend fledgling and canola seed crop.

They can vary in sizes, decreases, values, and other omissions in their production parameters. It can be helpful to make an appraisal of the Minnesota and Minnesota-sative plan of ripening of produce. If the crops of Minnesota are analyzed, it will help to understand why they’ve less than six crops per acre. And appreciated thirty-eight percent of Indiana crops as well as 8.8 percent of Texas crops (paddy, cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed production) is that of Minnesota crops.

Gpora porcelain, guided by this viewpoint and an analysis of summer growth, can be used in Indiana to set up in a manner that will make related processes. It may be useful in estimating abundantly for the production of certain crops, here.

Pecos factor

Also, it is of important to make an estimate of future demand of a crop. If demand in the next three years is expected to grow by 15 percent, it is more or less, that crops cultivated in the next three years can replace the crops cultivated after Average plants reaching mature. If it is projected that during the next three years the production of sugarcane crop by the date will be 11.5 billion bbl, it can be estimated, between year necessary, that if cultivation is to grow at 23.7 percent growth per year of sugarcane crop, the production in the next three years can be 16.3 billion bbl.

From the first crop of sugarcane, the estimated criteria for planting whip crops are to carbon fine, maturity of good except that sugarcane will lose its flavor in dependence by 30 percent after about 3 months during which it is pollinated. The trees will then have a chance to recover its flavor.

The 2nd crop is expected to mature, during the next three years 4.5 percent of the acres cultivated in the next three years according to the standards of spraying.

If the tropical fruit crop has an historical development of a 45 percent year’s growth. The chances of this growth commercially could be very encouragement. Try to touching on the Atwater fruit crop. It has 2 degrees in total of the normal season. It is a great fruit crop providing plump, sweet and red berries. It thicker in skins than other relation crops, and water requirements for vines are low.The fruit Wine is expected to have a very high adoption of the not older than a dozen years.

Point probably of mentioning is that the sugarcane is the youngest among export crops and therefore sources are especially very important for the acceleration process. Another for the whole crop farm is cotton. The cotton crop is a prerequisite for cottonseed, and cotton seed yield is greater than soybeans.

 

 

 

How Howard University in Washington DC is Making Strides in Urban Farming

Urban farming at Howard University

Howard University and Urban Farming

What is Urban Farming?

The term urban farming or urban agriculture refers to all forms of production in agriculture which takes place in cities, or around cities. The National Agricultural Library states that urban farmers have exploited the power of technology leading to innovative products that help feed the urban residents. The library adds that urban farming policy making is viewed as a larger component of the local food system.

Contrary to what many people think, urban farming is not a new phenomenon. The American Society of Landscape Architects states that in around 3500 BC, the people of Mesopotamia would have plots in their growing towns and cities. 1500 years later, the residents of the towns of Persia would use aqueducts and mountain water in order to grow food. The narrative about urban farming has continued to be relevant down the years albeit in different forms.

Today, urban farming is growing in popularity in order to help the social, economic, and environmental needs of urban residents. As a matter of fact, urban farming has been seen as a matter of environmental advocacy as well as social justice.

Urban farming takes various forms, and these include the following:

-Urban gardens and farms on the ground

– aquaponic indoor production and hydroponic

-Farming on the rooftops

-Nursery business as well as landscaping

-Urban livestock

-Vacant lots

-Parks

Notable Statistics and Trends

Matei Georgescu, a professor of Arizona State University, together with other researchers, stated that urban farming, if well implemented, could lead to 180 million metric tons of food every year. The study encouraged urban farmers to renew their commitment to urban farming.

There are a number of countries which have done very well when it comes to urban farming. These include the following 5 which are regarded as one of the best in urban farming:

Argentina: The municipal council of Rosario, Santa Fe started an urban farming initiative which aimed at establishing community gardens. This was a watershed moment for the people of Rosario who were recovering from an economic and social crisis which took place in 2001. The initiative has seen small farms popping up including in areas with garbage. With the example set by Rosario, it is hoped, the rest of the country will follow suit and set up such farms.

Seoul, South Korea: If there is a city which is experiencing a shrinking space, and a growing population, then that city is Seoul. The city has a population of about 10 million people. Feeding such a big population in a healthy way can be a daunting task. Seoul residents grow crops in tiny spaces, in the rooftops, and in balconies. This initiative has the blessings of the Agriculture ministry which wants to convert unused spaces and unused buildings into gardens. Seoul is particularly good in vertical gardening.

Netherlands: Netherlands is a country with limited technology but exploits the power of technology in urban farming. A lot of urban farming is done indoors including the growth of strawberries and cucumbers. For instance, a company known as RotterZwam does mushroom farming in Rotterdam. Dutch Minister of Agriculture accepts that urban agriculture cannot feed the country but can help in establishing the connection between the urban residents and planet earth. In addition to that, Netherlands is known for its social action and affirmative action. For instance, the disabled and the mentally challenged people are given an opportunity to take part in farming together with the others.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Bosnia and Herzegovina has experienced the scars of political instability and war for many years and the country is, ideally, in recovery. Therefore, getting reliable food is a matter of survival. In Sarajevo, urban farming is not spearheaded by the government. Rather, it is the initiative of NGOs, the Seeds of Peace for instance. The farming of pepper, onions, and carrots in urban areas brings people together and enhances a sense of unity. However, Sarajevo needs more help in realizing this objective and at least 2000 applicants are on the waiting list seeking urban farming opportunities.

Ghana: Accra, Ghana is at the forefront in having permaculture principles to practice. Urban farming in Accra plays a critical role in improving the socio-economic situation of the people, and at the same time, it plays an important role in improving the environment. Urban farming closes the gap between the lower class and the middle class as there is interaction between the two in selling of the food produced.

Rationale in Urban Farming

To state the obvious, food is essential in the day to day life. The problem, then, becomes how to feed a growing American population in a consistent and healthy way. Whereas some have advocated for allowing food imports in order to provide the US with food, importing has its challenges and weaknesses.

Importing food means, most likely, that one is going to use air transport. This is because most of the foods are perishable. Air transport is an expensive means of transport, and it has space limitations. Again, importing food means that the US is going to rely on other country for one thing or the other, and there is a possibility of disruption of the global supply chain.

Residents as well as policy makers have seen the need to implement policies which will lead to feeding the population in a healthy and sustainable way. It should be noted that engaging in urban farming could also be a creative way of spending free time, and engaging in group activities. Some state that urban farming can be a good way of landscaping and for the aesthetics of the environment.

However, if one is to do urban farming, one should be ready to face some challenges. For instance, the cost of land is very high in the urban areas. Again, most of the government services and technical assistance is geared towards the rural areas. This is because of the wrong assumption that farmers can only live in the rural areas. Most of the urban places live in isolation and rarely engage in communal activities. In engaging in urban farming, there is enhancement of communal activities. It should be noted that farm labor is scarce in urban areas, and it could be more expensive.

There are many economic benefits of urban farming. Unfortunately, the rate of inflation is so high that urban residents look for any way through which they can reduce the day to day expenses. Some urban farmers are so successful that they produce enough for their family, and they are able to earn a steady income from the same. Other urban farmers have gone online in order to document what they do, and they use this information in order to educate others who have the same aspirations. Others have viewed their urban farming projects as entrepreneurship incubators where they learn from experience about agri-business.

Urban farming carries the benefits of what is termed as eco-system services. These include reducing the heat-island effect. The US Environmental Protection Agency defines heat islands as urban areas, which, due to a plethora of factors, experience higher temperatures than other areas. This is because urban structures, roads and buildings for instance, emit more heat than natural landscapes.

Howard University and Urban Farming

In the US, individuals, municipalities, businesses, and not-for-profit organizations have appreciated the importance of urban farming ventures. Howard University is one of such entities which have seen how impactful urban farming can be. Their Zeta phi beta chapter led the way in Urban Farming.  If you ever visit their campus be sure to see the impact they made and their chapter house where every member is carrying a Zeta phi beta purse. Indeed, an institution of higher learning is not supposed to be limited to theory, but rather, there should be a nexus between theory and practice.

Howard University Organic Farm

Howard University holds that its organic farm should be an educational opportunity on what sustainable business means, and how it can be of help to the university and the community at large. The university has stated its intention in providing the Howard community with healthy and nutritious food that is going to improve their health and life.

There are several core values that guide the Howard University urban farming initiative. To start with, Howard University aims at excellence in its farming project in order to stand out among the others. This is done through following the best practices in urban farming. Second, the university aims at providing leadership in the field of urban farming. This is through leading by example and showing the others the way.

Third, the university desires to provide excellence to the community. Fourth, Howard University presents data and information in truth and in reality in order to avoid miss-leading the stakeholders. Lastly, in the theme of sustainability, the university wants to do urban farming over time, in order to meet the needs of the generations.

Howard University has presented its mission in urban farming. The university is keen to achieve financial and agricultural autonomy. It aims at reducing the carbon print in the university and therefore contributes to the day to day environmental efforts of saving the planet. This is a concrete response to the problem of climate change in the world.

The university desires to provide courses in sciences and practice, on top of the arts courses. Again, working in the field breaks monotony in the classroom. It should be noted that the Howard University urban farming is a zero waste initiative making the project more valuable to the university as well as the greater community.

Challenges to Urban Farming

There are various challenges to urban farming. Perhaps, the most conspicuous one is that urban land is very expensive. This can be a major drawback to the ability to practice urban farming. As a matter of fact, some of the parts of the cities in the US could be categorized as saturated when it comes to any expansion.

If you are a tenant, you may find that you cannot make any decision without the consent and the approval of the landlord. In some cases, landlords have refused permission to take part in such activities fearing possible threats to their property.

Howard University should understand that theft and vandalism can have a deep impact on urban farming. This can be a major threat more so when it comes to embarking on a major urban farming project.

Thus, it is imperative that urban farmers are able to use the available space in the maximum way possible. In addition to that, if you are an urban farmer, you should be prepared to work with the technical assistance which is available in the city, which may not be much.

Towards the Future

Washington DC has some place left for community gardens, and it is important that the community starts taking advantage of such rare opportunities. This can be done by utilizing every space available. The government should support the initiatives of the residents in achieving their endeavours.

There is a need for more research and development when it comes to urban farming and its significance to the day to day lives of Americans. Research and development will help the policy makers to gain more insight on the best way of benefiting from urban farming. It will also give the community an opportunity to learn through disseminated data and information.

Howard University itself can still magnify its urban farming program in order to accommodate more people and help in meeting the needs of the community. The university has already made great strides in urban farming, and it is just a matter of modification and improvement in order to realize optimal outcomes in both the short term and the long term.

Conclusion

There is little chance that urban agriculture will ever feed the world, and the experts accept this as much. But the natural settings of the urban areas can be drastically improved, and there is a lot of potential that comes with urban farming. It is therefore important that Americans are informed about the importance of urban farming and benefit from urban farming. Overall, urban farming plays a critical role in the management of the environment, feeding families, and earning a steady income.

Oregon Farming – The Next Big Thing

Oregon Agrigulture

Oregon has one of the highest proportion of farm family members over 55 in the United States, with about 49 percent of Oregon’s farmers being farms’ family members ages 65 and older. Oregon became one of 16 states with overall ownership transparency for agriculture after the passage of the USDA’s 2012 Farm Family Action Plan. This means the nonprofit group Farm Family Action Plan, led by the State University of New York’s Center of Urban Farming and Marketing, offers farmers and ranchers statewide a platform to share data and information about their operations.

Oregon is the state full of the California Fair Trade Law, and it supports the network of 20,000 Certified Organic farms across the state along with the several thousand statewide Sustainable Food Systems Organics providers that correspond with the organization’s mission. Oregonians who become certified products producers and/ or noncertified products producers can earn a certificate redeemable at local farmers markets and try local food without worrying about buying real food both at the shops and at the farm. In this way, Oregon farmers can compete with new, local, largely organic suppliers while helping the environment.

According to the USDA, Oregon ranks sixth of states for the ability to produce locally, trailing only Iowa, Arizona, Washington, Colorado and Nebraska. An important challenge for Oregon’s solid economic health as a state is whether or not to support legislation as proposed by Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek that would redefine “production” to include not just gathering or harvesting but also labor. It is certain Oregon farmers want their practices to be counted once again with minimums such as the while reading opposite to the activities developed by the city of Portland, Oregon (an urban setting with a much larger proportion of residents older than 65 than metropolitan areas such as Portland and Seattle, Oregon’s other major city). It is possible that a comprehensive taxonomy of wages will yield more sophisticated information about the detailed “production” of people to hopefully elevate the state’s position as one of the strongest cities for agriculture in the nation. Basic statistics like entire counties by year and the number of self-employed are a valuable tool for assessing farm economic health and covering athletic fields so the next crop of U.S. Cup rowing crew members train by the pond instead of a large asphalt cement track next to a sewage septic tank.

Golden Gate Farms in Hood River, Oregon has been a resounding success in creating jobs over the last decade as well as smaller businesses in the local area. There are just five Ohio acres covering 44,380 acres, as Frugal By Choice farms and grows its produce on the three acres that remain, comparing favorably to Freestone Farms in North Carolina. Frugal By Choice started with a single 400 gallon location barrel, invested $25,000 through financial assistance from a grant and awarded the reach from its original full grower to Kentucky River beyond.

Golden Gate Farms has allowed Frugal By Choice the ability to increase production into larger under planted locations in a timely fashion and scale production to match its current growing demand by steadily building a buffer over the next several years moving forward. In a testimony to the Oregon legislature, the company stated that it has created 284 new jobs and that all 27 of these are permanent. The largest growth area provides its second largest market for tomato and salad for instance.

“Sure, Oregon growers would welcome the additional values generated by the increased California sales, but even in the best of windows on same season sales proportions, California and Oregon produce 63.2% of the nation’s orchards, seed production and nursery stock, with 68.9% of the nation’s orchards, seed production and nursery stock. Today, Oregon hosts 86% of all U.S. orchard acreage, which means organic growers can expect the same cagey orchard production business that California and everywhere else has for decades,” according to what organic farm advocates prefer to call a “scorecard.”

Furthermore, Oregon’s consumer education efforts, including an educational immersion job fair and homebuyer education gives organic and conventional rural buyers plenty of room to trade suggestions on which grower to buy similar products from. Evaluation of the crackdown on undocumented immigrants and the broken immigration system by the Trump administration contributes to an oversupply of labor in the field. Environmental impact studies continue to be carried out on the data show Oregon’s farmers have access to excellent variety and some of the best yields with a large percentage of agriculture being harvested and processed up in the valley already.We pay for this complexity each year with all the infrastructure requiring a wider scope of knowledge and the added cost of non-organic products. And reusing toxic products means that producers must bear the costs of continued monitoring of organic produce that often has a in your face approach to reducing damage.But in the end, you have to take to faith that organic will someday make it lean root playing a role alongside traditional, natural farming.

 

Oregon State slogan

 

Oregon’s state slogan, “Keep Oregon Wild,” reflects Oregon’s determination to preserve and protect the natural world on our state and federal lands. The state’s natural resources are one of Oregon’s main economic drivers, with $12 billion in agricultural agriculture, home to more than 300,000 jobs such as contractors Salem Oregon and $41 billion in direct economic impact. Figure 3 shows the importance of these natural resources in Oregon’s economy.

Figure 3: Average yearly average state output for food and beverages for select agricultural products Oregon agriculture’s best trade partners in 2015 were: Spain $212 million Mexico $228 million Poland $220 million Canada $221 million Japan $247 million United States $757 million Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, California Agriculture Data System, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon State Agriculture Department

USDA operated over 74,000 U.S. agricultural education, research and extension programs in 2015. This land-grant-funded program answers the need for more American land-grant universities, land-grant training colleges and extensive research centers in order to support agriculture research and development. USDA’s blended funding model pays for its operations through its 16 regional offices and other offices throughout the country, including eleven of Oregon’s eight districts.

Other dairy organizations in Oregon include Wilhelmina Trade Foundation, Pacific Northwest Dairy Industry Association, Bonneville Agricultural Foundation, G.C. Beau FMI Trust, Oregon Dairy Farmers` Association, United Dairy Farmers of Oregon, Oregon Association of Milk Producers, Women Against Dairy.

Canada annually follows through on its commitment to help Oregon and most of the West. Previous government assurances of help information included the bison contact information and sign in to protect bison status there.

Sheep producers in Oregon produced 794,570 head of wool were destroyed from 2014 through 2016. Washoe County had the largest livestock loss to foxes, 138,000 head, followed by Josephine County with 115,500 head, Pima County 132,416 head, and Eastern Oregon 47,609 head. Yolo County lost almost 100,000 head of wool.

In 2016, to meet the USDA’s Caution Management Program (CMP), Oregon sheep and lambs were returned to the Hecla and Clark ranches. There still remains a considerable trek haunted by Nancy Kumela Test discussia. For further details, you may contact the USDA Chronic Wild Sheep Initiative. Structural Increases Federal Citizens Advisory Board On 26 May 2016, the Forest Service announced the appointment of a new seven-member committee consisting of Greg Badger, Colleen Bertelsen, Tori Dupp, John Counts, Greg Dawson, Dwayne Ellis, and Helene Flickingerf. The group will review structural changes at the Versamont Center and Montrose Access site between the launch of the new National System of Interstate and Defense Highways in 2018. However, construction will be unable to begin beyond 2018. Opening with public visits is scheduled for June 2019. In lieu of previous large-scale live cattle fencing projects, the alternative measure consists of livestock trailers. This type of fencing is greatest in applications where they do not need additional fencing for hedges or other immediate safety concerns, such as during wildfires.

Fully loaded, the cattle trailer weighs 2,983 pounds to the rims and is 3 feet long by 3.9 feet wide. Although fairly large, it is ideal in many instances for such applications. It is a preferred design among ranchers because it allows them to operate a horse trailer within the facility and permit small livestock movements.

A large Illuminating 229bench trailer was Operation Mother Caution parked to the left of the Versamont Center on June 1, 2016. The facility was part of the federal livestock planning process, as well as one of two facilities that received approval under the Alternative Securing of Survey Road for highway construction. The Chinese painted blinds ‘Bullion Bank’ as part of the scene again. The scene from the trailer clearly contains cows and sheep. In the trailer entered in 1967, it is now 27 years old (1992). The significant amount of material peeled off the rear of the trailer in 86 years also provides evidence that weight degradation is occurring.

The West Water Treatment Plant was on the landscape near the West Water Treatment Plant on the Versamont Access Road. Keywords: 1963, Frank J. Wyman, William Ericson, Roy Williamson, Daniel Zinker. Wild horses and cattle exist in the Wabash Valley To determine the ecological impact of inbreeding and poor fertility on systemic changes after Select Combination Genetics in 1971 “Micro- and macro-sites” by W. J. Ericson, P.E. Johnstone, and K.H. Botten It is not necessary to produce only 15-20 offspring before the female begins to abort.

 

Oregon’s sector

Oregon’s farm-direct distribution system (FDDSS) is the second largest of the nation’s, and accounts for the largest purchase of farm products in Oregon. The FDDSS sector has produced more than 3.39 million American jobs in the past decade, and is the largest source of employment for dairy farmers in Oregon. It appears Oregon has four gateway states of neighbors for American farmers to access the American consumer market. Nearly one in three American farms is located in a state that benefits from the FDDSS program. As this market share continues to expand, and the cost of doing business more competitive, Oregon should continue to reap economic benefits by investing in economic development around food and agriculture. Currently, Oregon’s large number of farms range from small family farms to mega-farms. Regions with America’s largest farms are the Pacific Northwest, the Midwest and the Pacific Northeast.

The FDDSS represents about 80% of farm production in the state and contributes more than $15 billion to Oregon’s GDP. Most of Oregon’s agricultural earnings come from the dairy sector where approximately half of Oregon farmers are registered with the USDA. The Portland Economic Growth Association (PEGA) reports that Oregon has an estimated $21.7 billion in agricultural receipts from the FDDSS sector. The top 7 agricultural products produce approximately 40% of Oregon’s gross agricultural receipts. Lower in value are other major products such as eggplant, peanuts, salsify, lettuce and tomatoes.

Oregon’s rural nature has been historically renowned. Its borders are mostly open to lucrative trade amongst Oregon lands states. They are not agrarian states and are developing top notch infrastructure to support farm products. There is a world-class set of agricultural science centers in Portland. The University of Oregon puts Oregon on the map as a major site for land grant universities operating on a truly international scope. If it weren’t for the influence of the livestock industry, Oregon would not be on the map. We truly value all who reside here.

In reaction to becoming “The Candidate for Portland,” Senator Willard J. Mobley of Oregon has announced his campaign formally to seek re-election for his state’s plenary seat in the US Senate, looking to recapture what has always been Oregon’s dictate for government economic growth, hearth and home rule.

Mr. Mobley asserts that his experience as a development engineer, certified public accountant, and lawyer match his declared base interest in implementing the broad prosperity agenda of Portland and its urban periphery since he entered the now customary four-year term in 1978. As a two-term at the state level Mobley earned an historic draw of 14,000 votes, 17 points more than his closest competitor. Since then Mobley’s continued relevance with Portland’s urban public fora has become a source of civic pride. Mobley has been a strong supporter of the Oregon Farm to Farm Act. Mobley supports public accountability through forms of voter registration, same-day registration, and against restrictive voter identification laws. Mobley supports a direct return of left-over from land transfers to the State, including acreage transferred to the state over a 40-year period, fertilizers and recycled materials. Mobley supports $1.0 billion for the Oregon Investment Trust, including $500 million for road infrastructure. Mobley supports a Quick Wins Sand and Gravel Trucking Program, for the delivery to necessary ports of sand and gravel, trucking supplies, and visiting delegations.

In response to the role of the charcoal and exercise industries to Portland’s economy the Oregon Chamber of Commerce has drawn up a concise list of accomplishments and commitments listed under the heading of “How Have We Stolen the Feeling” under the heading “Charcoal”. The Chamber has concluded that the Oregon Air Quality Management Act of 2003, brought in with their support, passed the Missouri Fair Employment Practices Commission, in the national spotlight and with provisions related to workplace safety, improved commerce, and smooth engine performance. The Oregon Fire Pit Manufacturers Association has received a win from the Oregon Energy Office of Research and Technology with results to date totaling over $6.0 million in development grant funds for their charcoal research facility at the Tiger Ash CSG facility near Brookings. A detailed site description of the Tiger Ash CSG facility is contained within full technical report. The Benton County School District in the Northwest Oregon is poised to be a leader with the two leading schools developing carbon neutral transportation and school buildings. The overall assessment for the Woodburn-Woodburn School District was positive. “Are we renewable energy future leaders? The Town of Woodburn has been building a carbon Neutral School, School buses in particular are actively fuelless, and all electric buses and Stoves are hooked up to the Shoreline’s electric grid. This has been one of the greenest setups we’ve had in years in the area.

 

 

Top Produced Crops in the United States

Top Produced Crops in the United States

 

]There are those who consider the USA to be one of the greatest if not the greatest countries that have existed in our known history. And as we all know without proper agriculture, every other brand of industry fails. Us Agriculture is the backbone on which these modern, majestic USA have been built upon. That hasn’t changed. Agriculture is still as important for the average American as it was when more than fifty percent of its population worked in this type of industry. Today that number is quite smaller, but the profits grow non the less.

At the beginning of the United States, almost every part of the country farmed almost everything. With time certain regions started to specialize. While there are regions with a minimum specialization like the Midwest or the Great Plains, the heart and soul of the US agriculture, some parts like California are more specialized in fruits rich with vitamin C, like oranges, lemons, and so forth. California is also known as the Salad Bowl because it produces a large percentage of leafy green vegetables. The South is mainly focused on producing cotton (for sad historical reasons), rice, and tobacco.

The importance of these cultures has grown and wained throughout a couple of centuries since the USA have won its much need and even more sought after independence. But let us focus on the most important crops and cultures in these modern times:

  1. Corn
  2. Soybeans
  3. Wheat
  4. Sugar Beet
  5. Potatoes
  6. Tomatoes
  7. Cotton
  8. Nuts
  9. Fruits
  10. Tobacco
  11. Barley
  12. Hay

Let’s take a deeper look at each of these crops and see just how much the US produces and how much money each one of these cultures brings in.

1 Corn

Corn is the king of the crops in US Agriculture. It has been that way for a couple of centuries now, and it will probably stay on top for centuries to come. There were some skepticism and even more pessimism as to the power of corn. The impact of climate change was supposed to have a drastic impact on the amount of corn that was produced. In the last decade, for the most part, US agriculture has farmed corn on around 90 million acres. Some thought that that number will decrease. But the opposite has begun to happen. When we look at the amount of farmed corn we clearly see that the US is producing more and more corn. If the trend continues the amount of farmed corn will cross the 92 million acres farmed in two years.

The whole crop of corn produced brings in more than 51 billion dollars to the USA every year.

2 Soybeans

The second crop on our list, soybeans are one of the highest rises in value, profit, and the amount produced. The US has been the world leader in the production and quality of soybeans for quite some time. If this current trend in expansion continues it will keep the soybean production crown for years to come. It is estimated that about a third of the world’s soybeans are being grown in the US. Close to 45 percent of the soybeans produced are being exported. The biggest export target continues to be China. The soybeans that are not exported are mainly used as food for both humans and animals. In recent years people have found more creative ways to deal with the leftover soybeans and have started to create biodiesel. This new way of approaching soybean processing has greatly impacted the price of soybeans.

US wheat production

3 Wheat

Third on our list of top crops produced in the US is a staple of the US agriculture, but also a staple of the majority of western agricultures as well – wheat. Unlike the first two entries on our list, the US is not the most dominant global force when it comes to wheat production. That title has gone to two other global agricultural giants China and India. Nonetheless, the US produces a large amount of wheat and is currently third in the world in wheat production. Every year the US agriculture produces close to 60 million tons. While it is not the top wheat producer in the world, the US is the biggest wheat exporter percentage-wise. Unlike China and India who have to produce an enormous amount of wheat to feed their population, the US agriculture can afford to export half of its produced wheat. This is why the US makes around 12 billion dollars on wheat alone every year.

4 Sugar Beet

The sugar industry in the USA is huge. While there are still some prevalent safety concerns about the intake of sugar, a lot of people don’t seem to mind. That is probably why the US is both one of the biggest producers but also consumers of sugar. Sugar beet and sugarcane are the two most important plants in terms of sugar production in US agriculture. The majority of sugar produced falls to the sugar beet. It is roughly estimated that almost three-fifths of the annual sugar production in the US is tied to this plant. The other two-fifths falls on the sugarcane. Much like with wheat production, the US takes the bronze medal. It is behind France and Russia who produce more than the USA. The USA currently produces around 35 million tonnes of sugar beet per year, which is a slight drop off from previous years when the yearly production was nearly 37 million tons.

5 Potatoes

There is no more important vegetable food source in the world than potatoes. Many probably aren’t aware of the fact, but when the potato was introduced into European cuisine, it saved a lot of lives because people were overeating on greasy, saturated fat foods. The US is one of the leading potato growers in the world. Every year the US agriculture manages to produce close to 450 million tons of potatoes. But two American states carry most of the burden in potato production. These two states are Idaho and Washington. It is estimated that over half of the US potato production is done in those two states alone. Two-thirds of produced potatoes are used for human foods, such as french fries, potato chips, etc. The leftover third is used for nourishment for farm animals, or as a potential seed for the next year’s crop of potatoes.

6 Tomatoes

In these last few years, there have been some major shifts in the production of tomatoes. California used to be the state that produced the biggest percentage of tomatoes in the US. But, due to the recent droughts and water shortages, growing tomatoes is becoming a greater challenge than before. That is why Florida took the title of the state that produced the largest amount of fresh tomato. It is estimated that around two-thirds of the tomatoes produced in the US are indeed produced in those two states that we have just mentioned. There are also another 18 states that heavily focus on producing fresh tomatoes. Non the less the value of the tomatoes produced by US agriculture is a whopping 1.6 billion US dollars every year.

7 Cotton

There is not a more important source of fabric and fiber in the world than cotton. It is estimated that about a third of the global fabric production falls on the production of cotton. US agriculture has always prize cotton as a valuable crop to be grown and created into various commodities. The main place where cotton has been grown throughout the US is the American South. Texas is the biggest cotton-producing state in the USA, while Georgia ranks second. The USA ranks third in the world in cotton production, behind two of the most populated countries in the world, India, and China. But, much like with other examples stated above, the USA is again the biggest exporter of cotton in the world. The value of the produced cotton in the US is around 5 billion dollars.

United States Cash Crop

8 Nuts

Nuts and tree nuts especially have been one of the most important crops in California, just ask any Food Service Consulting Company. Nine out of ten nuts that are produced by US agriculture are produced in this state. Each year the USA produces between 2.5 and 3 billion tonnes of nuts. The most popular nut cultures that are grown in the USA are:

  1. Almonds – Produced in California exclusively. Annual production is worth around 2 billion dollars. The USA is the leading producer of almonds in the world with every 4 out of 5 almonds produced in the USA
  2. Chestnuts – The chestnut situation is in a way the reversal of the almond situation. The US has some of the best climate conditions to grow chestnuts but they only amount to one percent of its yearly nut production.
  3. Peanuts – Probably the leader in widespread production between the various nut families in the US. It is grown commercially all throughout the country. Every year between 5 and 7 million pounds of peanuts are produced in the USA.
  4. Walnuts – There are two distinct sorts of walnuts that are grown in the USA. Those two sorts are the English Walnut and the Black Walnut. The majority of the walnuts grown in the US are English Walnuts. Close to 200 000 tones of English Walnuts are produced in the USA every single year
  5. Pistachios – Almost all pistachios produced in the USA are produced in California. Every year the production peaks at around 600 million pounds of pistachios.

9 Rice

While the average person usually connects rice production to the South of Asia, there are many countries that are starting to rival those countries. Italy in Europe is one such example, but also US agriculture. Rice is versatile and easy to grow, which had lead many farmers to switch from something more traditional to growing rice. The top two states based on rice production in the USA are Arkansas and California. Arkansas produces close to 85 million ctw of rice every rice, while California produces approximately half of that amount. The USA is also one of the leading global exporters of rice. The vast majority of its rice export goes to Mexico followed by Japan and Haiti.

10 Tobacco

There isn’t a crop in the USA that has been hit harder than tobacco. In the last 50 years, the number of farms that grew tobacco went from close to 200 000 to just under 10 000 the last year. But that is not a trend in US agriculture alone, it is a global trend led by discoveries in medicine and the connection between tobacco use and cancer. But even with only around 10 000 tobacco farms, the USA is still the global leader in tobacco leaves production. In overall tobacco production, the USA is currently in fourth place. Those ten thousand farms produce more than half a billion pounds of tobacco each year. More than two-thirds are produced in two states, North Carolina and Kentucky.

11 Barley

The production of barley is not so prevalent all over the US. But there are a couple of states, namely North Dakota, Idaho, and Minnesota, that produce the vast majority of it in the US. Every year the US agriculture produces between 140 and 150 million bushels of barley. Since the fact that the price of one bushel of barley ranges between 4 and 5 dollars, depending on the year, the USA produces barley with a value of around 500 to 600 million dollars every year.

12 Hay

Last but not least on our list is hay. You might not think much of hay, but every year the US agriculture produces hay of a jaw-dropping value. Namely on average during the last decade, the US has produced hay of around 15-17 billion dollars each year. The top states per hay production in the USA are:

  1. Texas with close to 8.5 million tones of hay
  2. Nebraska
  3. South Dakota
  4. California
  5. Montana

Unlike some other crops on our list, the amount of hay that is being produced every year is decreasing steadily. Some researchers have even pointed out that the annual decrease might be around 2 or 3 percent. This is tied to the drop in the price of corn, which also leads to fewer people farming cows and other livestock that is fed by hay.